Gen Z Workers of Vietnam Need Upskilling

Gen Z Workers of Vietnam Need Upskilling

Generation Z, or Gen Z, is a term used to refer to the demographic cohort called “Millennials” born between 1995 and 2010. This cohort is currently between the ages of nine and 24 years old.

The Gen Z is now growing up and is expected to enter the workforce within the next few years. Now, business leaders need to be ahead in harnessing the generation’s talents and appealing to their interests.

In 2018, Nielsen published an article titled ‘How to engage with Generation Z in Vietnam. It is expected that Gen Z will comprise 25% of the labour workforce in the country by 2025. The article also described this generation as the cohort that embraces multiculturalism with care for environmental matters, gender equality, and social responsibility.

These characteristics are prominent when Gen Z workers express the sentiment through brand choices; whereas, 50% favor brand that mirrors Vietnamese cultures and values.

How Generation Z will choose their careers

Gen Z workers will be cautious. They are most likely to seek sensible career choices that are shaped by practical realities.

Adecco Vietnam reports that when it comes to choosing a job, Gen’s top priority is salary and benefits followed by professional recognition of qualities and job satisfaction.

The survey revealed that 48% of Gen Z learned about career choices through social media, while 19% said it was through school or university. These figures complement their attitude towards technology, not knowing a world without smartphones and social media.

In a Forbes article published in 2018 titled ‘Understanding Vietnam’s Generation Z’, Gen Z uses an average of 2.77 social media platforms each week. But surprisingly, this group is least interested in sharing personal lives on social media for public record and are most likely to use anonymous social media platforms like Snapchat.

Additionally, Gen Z workers will retain the connection of their jobs to social impact as the top priority. This is according to Dell Technologies’ research in 2018 titled ‘Gen Z: The Future has Arrived. While Gen Z is seeking for job security and monetary motivation, they are also less interested in climbing the corporate ladder and are more likely to support their companies’ growth and success. 43% said that they want to work in environmentally and socially responsible organisations.

Boosting the skills of the future workforce

Technological advancements and labour markets’ rapid changes impacted the youth’s skills and are prompting them to upgrade or risk being outdated. 

World Economic Forum (WEF) conducted a research this year which revealed that 69.3% of Vietnamese youth expressed awareness on the importance of updating their current education and skills.

Adecco Malaysia and Vietnam’s General Director, Andree Mangels, said:

“They start to look for internship opportunities right in the first year of college and don’t hesitate to broaden their networks through events. Yet, their skills are still very academic, which required additional training, especially soft skills.”

Vocational schools in Vietnam are pushed to include soft skills training in their curriculum to meet the market needs. 49% of Vietnam’s Gen Z claimed that fruitful sources come from internship programs. 41% said that it may come from student clubs and 35% noted part-time jobs.

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) partnered with SAP and has announced plans of providing quality education, digital skills, and life skills training for the disadvantaged Vietnamese communities to help them prepare for decent work.

The Vietnamese government will also take part in the plan to enhance 11,000 secondary and vocational school students in Vietnam in the first year.

Josephin Galla, Managing Direcot of SAP Vietnam, said:

“Businf Adecco Malaysia and Vietnam, said that Vietnam’s Gen Zs are proactive. “They start to look for internship opportunities right in the first year of college and don’t hesitate to broaden their networks through events. Yet, their skills are still very academic, which required additional training, especially soft skills.”

Additionally, the Boeing Company and The Asia Foundation announced plans to open a one-year vocational training that will focus on the development of practical information skills for Hanoi and Hai Duong’s disadvantaged young adults.

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